This issue of
Citylife

Your Say

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[right]Your say is an open forum for you the reader to express your opinions. Write to: [email protected], subject: Your say. Letters can be on any subject and priority will be given to letters under 200 words.Letters may be edited for clarity or conciseness. Name and contact details must be supplied[/right]

• How Can We Win when the Game is Rigged?

Thanks to you and to your colleagues for the articles on noise pollution. You are all doing an invaluable job at raising awareness of this issue in Thailand in general and Chiang Mai in particular.

However, the discussion of Chalerm Krung ‘Cafe’ (as they like to call themselves in order to disguise their true activity) and how it can reduce its noise level (not that it wants to), shouldn’t even be taking place since the club is totally illegal!

The deputy governor, in his letter (Reference 0017.1/80) dated January 12 , 2553 and addressed to the Punna Residence Juristic Person, stated that the police confirmed to him that the club does not have any kind of license at all: no business license, no restaurant/cafe license, no entertainment license, no liquor license!

That means, of course, that the club also has had no health and safety inspections or controls and can avoid the rules and regulations that apply to legal entertainment spots (such as soundproofing and fire prevention measures): sounds like another Santika just waiting to happen!

Since the governor’s office and the police both admit, in writing, that the club is totally illegal, why is it still open? Well, I guess we all know the answer to that one!

Regards,

Sleepless in Soi 6

• Charmless in Chiang Mai

Great article by William Parnham about noise pollution in Chiang Mai, an issue of growing concern to so many city residents. While many of us who live in villages outside of the cities learn to tolerate loudspeakers blasting national anthems at 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. as well as the odd announcement for the community, these are all charming – if still irritating – peculiarities of Thai living. However, there is nothing charming, simply peculiar and aggravating, about a business which makes huge amounts of money, yet refuses to take measures to be considerate to its neighbours. So, keep the pressure up. Now, you probably need to write about air pollution!

Polluted

• Happy Fair

I visited your Garden Fair for the first time this February, having read about it and heard about it for a couple of years. I had a really good time and think that many people should try to go. The shopping was so good and the prices even better, and the food stalls were all delicious. The best was the vibe. It reflects our international city with so many farang and Thai mingling, talking, drinking and chatting. I will make the next event for sure, just tell me when!

Aroon M.

• Smogged Out

I have never written a letter to a publication before, but having lived here for a decade, I am at my wit’s end. Today, 16th March, I woke up, drew my curtain, opened my window, and was assaulted by bilious and noxious smog. Am I living in 19th century London? I find the lackadaisical attitude of not only authorities, but the average resident of the north of Thailand concerning this matter not only irresponsible, but frightening. Guys, this is DANGEROUS!

Smokey mountain

• Sinking Ship

I would be interested to know how many expats have left Chiang Mai over the past few years because of the pollution. Any figures anywhere?

Drowning in pollution

• Got a Light?

Last night I was driving along the Canal Road and I saw a great big fire in the distance. I can’t believe they grow mushrooms in that.

Bill